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Government Transparency and Accountability

The cost and burden of government cannot continue to make Ohio among the worst states economically, so we must institute strong government reform and accountability measures. Elected officials and the people who run our state and local governments must be accountable for providing transparent, honest, and open government that works. Taxes and regulations – and the size of government – must be kept in check. We always will defend the small business owner and the individual over the bureaucrats and their unions.

Reports

January 28, 2014- Interested Party Testimony to the Ohio House Shared Services and Government Efficiency Subcommittee on DataOhio

 

 

December 3 Policy Brief: Ohio Takes Lead on Asbestos Reform

The American civil justice system is premised on the ability of injured plaintiffs to recover damages from the parties whose actions caused their injuries. In the context of asbestos liability, this enduring concept has been undermined. In many states, courts are clogged with asbestos-related suits, companies are paying for non-existent injuries, and truly sick plaintiffs may be left with nothing to recover in the future.  This Policy Brief describes how this took place and what Ohio is doing to improve the situation in terms of transparency and fairness.

 
 

 

October 2012 Policy Brief-The Obama Administration's Auto Bailout Failure

This Policy Brief shows how the Obama Administration's auto bailout injected politics into the reorganization process for GM and Chrysler while inhibiting the industry's long-term ability to fully recover. 

 

 

 

May 2012 Policy Brief- Big Government Spending Not Requisite for Economic Growth

This Policy Brief shows clearly that states that spend beyond their means do not prosper.  Instead, states that foster pro—growth public policies and restrain spending are best able to promote growth.  Few measures better demonstrate the relationship between government spending and private sector growth than state and local spending burdens. 

 

Buckeye Institute Testimony to House Legislative Study Committee on Technology

The Buckeye Institute offered testimony before a House committee on the benefits of continuing to embrace technological change as a way to make state government more efficient and better serve taxpayers.  In particular, it is suggested that the Department of Administrative Services redouble its focus on the consolidation of back room IT needs, that when at all possible, IT work should be outsourced to private sector companies that have the appropriate skill sets to achieve high value, and that Ohio consider implementing a state IT usage audit in order to gauge the productivity of state workers.

 

Crushing Weight: National Health Care Law Threatens to Make Medicaid an Unsustainable Burden for Ohioans

Smart on Crime: With Prison Costs on the Rise, Ohio Needs Better Policies for Protecting the Public

Dipped in Gold: Upper-Management Police and Fire Retirees become Public-Service Millionaires

The Grand Bargain is Dead:  The Compensation of State Government Workers Far Exceeds Their Private-Sector Neighbors

The Need for Levy Reform in Ohio -- Conversion Levy: One Vote, Permanent Tax Increases

Reforming Medicaid in Ohio:  A Framework for Using Consumer Choice and Competition to Spur Improved Outcomes

Decentralizing Federal Employment:  Feasibility and Impact on Ohio Cities

New Directions for Fiscal Policy in Ohio:  Citizens Attitudes toward Spending and Taxation

Should Ohio Limit Government Spending and Taxes?

Why Ohio Should Not Build High Speed Rail